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ROV Water Tank Inspection

August 16, 2019 Leave a comment

Water Tank Inspection. Water Tank Cleaning. ROV Water Tank Inspection. Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies has been a leader in underwater inspection services for potable water storage tanks.  Our inspection methods include Remote Cameras, ROV inspections and Potable Water Diver inspections.

 

Our inspections offer the most information for the lowest cost while never disrupting water service or draining your tank.  Check out our new ROV Tank Inspection Video on youtube.

We have a a fleet of ROV’s to insure we are ready to meet your inspection needs. For a free price quote call Debi at 817-377-4899, or toll free at 888-481-1768.

Visit our new web page at www.watertankinspection.com

 

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New water tank inspection video

August 14, 2019 Leave a comment

Water Tank Inspection. Water Tank Cleaning. KEEPING DRINKING WATER SAFE SINCE 1997. Check out our new video at www.watertankinspection.com.

Water Tank & Tower Inspection and Cleaning by Ron Perrin Water Tech.

August 10, 2019 Leave a comment

Ron Perrin Water Technologies performs over 800 Water tank inspection’s every year.

Since 1997 we have performed thousands of inspections for water utilities in 14 states.  Our remote underwater camera inspection is our most popular service.  Since 1997 we have performed thousands of inspections for water utilities in 14 states.

Visit our water tank inspection web site at: http://www.watertankinspection.com

Our Remotely operated Vehicle inspection is also popular for larger facilities.  We maintain a feet of three ROV’s to meet our customer demands at any time.  Our reports caver all required State and AWWA inspection points.  Be deliver the completed inspection report back in a notebook/binder for convienient reference and storage.

Water Tank Inspection ROV

DEEP TREKKER ROV

Diver inspections are our third method.  Often used when specific inspection goals are required.  Divers also perform inspections after tank cleanings.  The diver is sealed in his own environment and washed down with a chlorine solution to meet all AWWA and EPA requirements.  This allows the diver to enter the water system and move around freely.

 

Water tank & tower inspection and water tank & tower cleaning is our specialty since 1997.  Please visit our web site at www.ronperrin.us or www.watertankinspection.com for more information.  For a free price quote call 817-377-4899.

Do you need a Texas Inspection form? Just Click Here: FORM

 

HELP WANTED

June 17, 2019 Leave a comment

 

We are seeking experienced Water Utility Worker to perform tank inspections and general water tank maintenance procedures. No criminal history and good driving record are required.  Confined space and fall protection training is required before employment and may be provided free of charge.  Underwater camera and ROV training will also be provided.

PAID- Out of town travel is required on both positions (typically 3-4 days per week).

Potable WATER TANK DIVER WANTED

We are also looking for a commercial diver. No criminal history and good driving record are required.

Line Air Dive Training is Required. Commercial Diver Experience is preferred.
Fall protection and confined space training are required and may be provided free of charge for the right individual. CURRENT SCUBA, CPR Certification and recent diving physical are required, preference given to ADCI Certified Diver.  Top PAY for experienced Water TANK and TOWER DIVER. E-mail resume and salary history.

Key Responsibilities:
Work underwater and above water with a Dive Team of  3 – 4 commercially certified divers. Efficiently and effectively perform water tank and tower inspections and the

removal of tank sediment from the floor of water storage tanks.  Must be able to climb 100-200 foot ladders. Must be fit and able to carry gear bags up to 80 pounds.
Working Conditions:
Love of working outdoors is essential and the willingness to work in bad weather conditions.  (i.e. rain, high humidity and heat)
Required to work a minimum of 35 hours per week for FT position.
Able to work occasional weekends and overtime as needed.

Qualifications:
– Healthy physical status, current dive physical is required.

– Line air training, Scuba Certification, fall protection and confined space training are required (we can help with fall protection and confined space training if you do not have it already).

Employment is year round. Pay based on experience. Pre-employment drug screening is required. This position requires frequent out of town travel, paid by company (from Fort Worth, Texas). Please e-mail resume  and use “Resume” on subject line.

Call 817-377-4899 to schedule interview M-F 8 to 5.

 

See our current ad: Craigslist 

Download an application Here:

Click Here to Down Load an Application

on our employment page.

Categories: Uncategorized

The face of an American Hero

June 18, 2018 Leave a comment

11873436_10153227158054102_2229183870178177489_n  by Ron Perrin

I write a lot about drinking water contamination and the importance of keeping water storage tanks and towers clean.  I haven’t written about people that much but this is about both drinking water contamination and a particular person I think is an American Hero.

Pediatrician Mona Hanna-Attisha or Dr. Monica as her young patients call her, did not plan her life to be a hero and I am sure she doesn’t see herself that way now, but she is.  She is the person that made enough noise, would not take, “your wrong” or “everything is ok”, for an answer.  After noticing many of her young Flint, MI patients had lead poisoning, she suspected the water supply.  She is the person at the right place at the right time that stood up to say, something is very wrong here and she was not going to go away. 

Her story was covered on CBS Sunday Morning this past Fathers Day.  I had the opportunity to watch with my son and infant grandson. My son made the comment that she is a REAL AMERICAN HERO. I could not agree more.

I titled this, “The Face of an American Hero”, because Dr.  Mona Hanna-Attisha was born in Iraq and raised in Michigan after her family fled the regime of Saddam Hussein.  Being a true American is not about where you were born but about who you are and who you want to be. It has always been about doing the right thing. The USA has always attracted the best and brightest the world has to offer. I think we are very lucky to count her as one of us, and I wanted to share her story.  

She has written a book,  “What The Eyes Don’t See See“, by Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha.

If you missed her CBS interview check it out here:

https://youtu.be/pd2qxi2mF_4

 

 

DIVE SUPERVISOR WANTED

June 13, 2017 Leave a comment

SEE:  http://www.tankdiver.us

Fort Worth, Texas RON PERRIN WATER TECHNOLOGIES is Now hiring all Positions.

Call 817-377-4899 to set up your interview.  Send resume and salary history to

Debi at tankinspections@aol.com

 

Helpful USEPA Papers and Links

Here are three very helpful USEPA papers written by the Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water between 2002 and 2006.
Finished Water Storage Facilities August 15, 2002
Page 2
2.1.1 Sediment
Sediment accumulation occurs within storage facilities due to quiescent conditions which promote particle settling. Potential water quality problems associated with sediment accumulation include increased disinfectant demand, microbial growth, disinfection by-product formation, and increased turbidity within the bulk water. Instances of microbial contamination and disinfection by-product formation due to storage facility sediments are described in the Pathogen Contamination and Microbial Growth section and the Disinfection By-Product formation section, respectively.
Page 11
Comprehensive inspections are performed to evaluate the current condition of storage facility components. These inspections often require the facility to be removed from service and drained unless robotic devices or divers are used. The need for comprehensive inspections is generally recognized by the water industry. AWWA Manual M42 (1998) recommends that tanks be drained and inspected at least once every 3 years or as required by state regulatory agencies. Most states do not recommend inspection frequencies thereby leaving it to the discretion of the utility. States that do have recommendations are Alabama (5 years), Arkansas (2 years), Missouri (5 years), New Hampshire (5 years), Ohio (5 years), Rhode Island (external once per year; internal, every five years), Texas (annually), and Wisconsin (5 years). Kirmeyer et al. (1999) recommend that comprehensive inspections be conducted every 3 to 5 years for structural condition and possibly more often for water quality purposes.
Page 12
Kirmeyer et al. (1999) recommended that covered facilities be cleaned every three to five years, or more often based on inspections and water quality monitoring, and that uncovered storage Prepared by AWWA with assistance from Economic and Engineering Services, Inc. 12facilities be cleaned once or twice per year. Commercial diving contractors can be used to clean and inspect storage facilities that cannot be removed from service. AWWA Standard C652-92 provides guidelines for disinfection of all equipment used to clean storage facilities.
————
On December 2006 Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water. Total Coliform Rule Issue Paper. Inorganic Contaminant Accumulation in Potable Water Distribution Systems.
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Health Risks from Microbial Growth and Biofilms in Drinking Water Distribution Systems June 17, 2002
Page 26
G. Sediment Accumulation
Significant microbial activity may occur in accumulated sediment (USEPA, 1992b). Organic and inorganic sediments can also accumulate in low-flow areas of the distribution system, and enhance microbial activity by providing protection and nutrients (USEPA, 1992b). Biofilms that slough can accumulate in the periphery of distribution systems leading to sediment accumulation and the proliferation of some microorganisms (van der Kooij, 2000). Sediments may be an important source of nutrients in open finished water reservoirs, by accumulating slowly biodegrading materials which are then broken down and released into the water column (LeChevallier, 1999b). The opportunities for biofilm development may be more abundant in storage tanks than in distribution system piping. Frequently, water is drawn from storage tanks only when water demand is high, such as during drought, fire flow, and flushing operations. This intermittent use results in prolonged storage times that may lead to increased sediment accumulation and lack of a disinfectant residual in the finished water storage vessel. Biological and aesthetic effects can be observed following the release of accumulated sediments from low flow areas of the distribution system (Geldreich, 1990).
Many studies have identified microbes in accumulated sediments, including both pathogens and non-pathogens. These include bacteria, viruses, protozoa, algae, fungi and invertebrates. Opportunistic pathogens that have been detected, and can multiply in sediments, include Legionella andmycobacteria (van der Kooij, 2000). Some primary pathogens can also survive for some time in sediments. Hepatitis A virus survived more than four months in sediments at both 5/C and 25/C (Sobsey et al., 1986). Other opportunistic pathogens found in sediments include Pseudomonas fluorescens and Flavobacterium spp. (Berger et al., 1993). Sediments can also release nutrients into the water which stimulate biofilm growth downstream (LeChevallier, 1999b).
Page 34
I. Proper Storage Vessel Management and Alteration
Proper storage vessel management and alteration, when necessary, can prevent contamination of the distribution system. Following TCR violations in 1996 in Washington D.C., one measure that proved effective in bringing the system back into compliance was the cleaning, inspection and disinfection of storage tanks and reservoirs (Clark, et al., 1999). To reduce pathogen presence and biofilm development, systems should have a scheduled program to rehabilitate all water storage facilities (USEPA, 1997). Proper operation and maintenance of storage tanks and reservoirs is listed as a BAT in the TCR (USEPA, 1992b). Storage tanks and standpipes should be pressure flushed or steam cleaned, then disinfected before returned to service (USEPA, 1992b), preferably with a disinfectant solution. This may not only remove microbial contamination from the vessel’s inner surface, but also nutrients that may be present. Proper operation of storage vessels can also reduce excessive residence times, which can lead to microbial survival and growth, and biofilm formation. Properly designed inlets and outlets, and the overall system design can improve problems caused by dead ends (Trussell, 1999). Pathogen contamination due to air introduction can be reduced by installing air filters to guard against pollution entering covered water reservoirs (USEPA, 1992b). Covering finished water reservoirs can protect against contamination from airborne sources, surface runoff, accidental spills and animals, such as insects and birds (USEPA, 1992b). EPA’s Uncovered Finished Water Reservoirs Guidance Manual describes recommended contamination control measures related to birds and other animals, human activity, algal growth and insects and fish (USEPA, 1999b). An understanding of the storage hydraulics and operation is important in reducing contamination of the finished water.
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If you need assistance inspecting or cleaning water storage tanks or towers call
Ron Perrin Water Technologies toll free at 1-888-481-1768.
For a fast quote Fax your tank information to 817-246-1740.
Or e-mail your tank information:
Out of Texas contact Robert at perrinsales@gmail.com
Texas Water Utilities please contact Debi Wheelan at tankinspections@aol.com