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Posts Tagged ‘Potable water tank inspection’

Divers are the best way to keep your tanks clean

June 22, 2020 Leave a comment

Potable Water Divers can make quick work out of cleaning your water storage GST or EST.  Our dive crew wears a dry suit so that no part of their body touches your water supply, They are then washed down with a chlorine solution to meet USEPA standards.

Sediment is quickly removed by the diver.  This is very important due to the fact that sediment may contain bacteria, protozoa, viruses or other contaminants.  Removing the sediment that has built up on the floor of the water storage tank should be a scheduled maintenance procedure done at least every three to five years.

For a free quote on cleaning your storage tanks call 817-377-4899. Or click  – HERE – for an online form.

Why isn’t chlorine treatment of potable water enough to keep water safe?

March 18, 2020 Leave a comment

I had some water utility workers ask me, “Why isn’t chlorine treatment of potable water enough to keep water safe? Why should we worry about cleaning tanks when we already use chlorine?”

Chlorine works great as long as there is not a breach in the tank. When there is a breach like a hole in the top that lets birds and insects inside the tank, the chlorine can not keep up. This is why annual tank inspections are so important. People have died from this scenario, see: “Salmonella Outbreak in Alamosa, Colorado“. According to USEPA officials a sediment build up on the interior floor of a water storage tank is another type of breach. Bacteria like Legionella, protozoa like Cryptosporidium, and a wide range of viruses including Norovirus can hide and GROW in the tank sediment.

Do you know what the #1 cause of municipal water contamination is? According to the CDC it is a microscopic parasite called Giardia. The sediment becomes a perfect habitat providing both shelter and food for Giardia and many other microorganisms to grow. In time, the contaminants can reach a point where they overwhelm chlorine or any other disinfectant you may be using. Keeping tanks clean keeps your drinking water safe.

Giardia- Photo CDC website

Giardia- Photo CDC website

Top 10 Causes – Outbreaks in Public Water Systems*

For a complete listing of water-related surveillance data, see CDC’s Surveillance Reports for Drinking Water-associated Disease & Outbreaks.

A professional potable water Dive Crew can remove tank sediment along with everything that is growing in it with minimal water loss.  The diver is sealed in a DRY suit so there is no human contact with the water supply.  Before entering the water system the diver is washed down with a chlorine solution to meet state and federal guidelines. The diver can then enter the tank and make quick work of removing tank sediment and any contaminant that may be hiding in it. It is basic housekeeping! You would not drink out of a dirty glass, no one should drink out of a dirty water storage tank or tower either. If you need a water storage tank or tower cleaned, give us a call toll free at 1-888-481-1768 for a free quote.

For more information on Municipal Water Tank Cleaning see: Ron Perrin Water Technologies web Site: www.rpwt.us.

Content source: Centers for Disease Control and PreventionNational Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases

Inspection & Cleaning Quotes

August 26, 2019 Leave a comment

Water Tank Inspection and Cleaning is our business. This page is supported by Ron Perrin and his company Ron Perrin Water Technologies. If you would like a quote to inspect or clean a water storage tank or tower please call 817-377-4899 or click here.

IMG_0451

ROV Water Tank Inspection

August 16, 2019 Leave a comment

Water Tank Inspection. Water Tank Cleaning. ROV Water Tank Inspection. Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies has been a leader in underwater inspection services for potable water storage tanks.  Our inspection methods include Remote Cameras, ROV inspections and Potable Water Diver inspections.

 

Our inspections offer the most information for the lowest cost while never disrupting water service or draining your tank.  Check out our new ROV Tank Inspection Video on youtube.

We have a a fleet of ROV’s to insure we are ready to meet your inspection needs. For a free price quote call Debi at 817-377-4899, or toll free at 888-481-1768.

Visit our new web page at www.watertankinspection.com

 

Water Tank & Tower Inspection and Cleaning by Ron Perrin Water Tech.

August 10, 2019 Leave a comment

Ron Perrin Water Technologies performs over 800 Water tank inspection’s every year.

Since 1997 we have performed thousands of inspections for water utilities in 14 states.  Our remote underwater camera inspection is our most popular service.  Since 1997 we have performed thousands of inspections for water utilities in 14 states.

Visit our water tank inspection web site at: http://www.watertankinspection.com

Our Remotely operated Vehicle inspection is also popular for larger facilities.  We maintain a feet of three ROV’s to meet our customer demands at any time.  Our reports caver all required State and AWWA inspection points.  Be deliver the completed inspection report back in a notebook/binder for convienient reference and storage.

Water Tank Inspection ROV

DEEP TREKKER ROV

Diver inspections are our third method.  Often used when specific inspection goals are required.  Divers also perform inspections after tank cleanings.  The diver is sealed in his own environment and washed down with a chlorine solution to meet all AWWA and EPA requirements.  This allows the diver to enter the water system and move around freely.

 

Water tank & tower inspection and water tank & tower cleaning is our specialty since 1997.  Please visit our web site at www.ronperrin.us or www.watertankinspection.com for more information.  For a free price quote call 817-377-4899.

Do you need a Texas Inspection form? Just Click Here: FORM

 

CBS 11 i-Team watches as my company inspects and cleans a north Texas water tower.

November 20, 2014 Leave a comment

November 7th, 2014, Ginger Allen and the CBS 11 i-Team watches as my company inspects and cleans a north Texas water tower. The tower was cleaned as a normal maintenance procedure. A light- brown dusting of sediment was removed from the interior floor before it could get deep enough to support bacteria and become a problem.   OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA The tower was cleaned by a Commercial Diver who was trained at OCEAN CORP, Houston, Texas. The Diver is sealed in his own environment, then washed down with a chlorine solution. Because we specialize in the inspection and cleaning of Potable Water Storage Facilities, all of our equipment is purchased for, and only used in, potable water. This utility is doing a great job of maintaining their system. However, utility managers across the country struggle to get the funds to properly maintain their systems. The EPA is currently considering a regulation that would require all water storage facilities to be inspected and cleaned at regular intervals. This new requirement could improve the water quality for millions of Americans.

Ron Perrin Speaks to News Crew

Ron Perrin Speaks to News Crew

The EPA is taking comments on this proposed regulation until the end of the year. We have the contact information posted on our blog, or you can just take our poll at: www.cleanwatertankproject.com. The poll results will be turned in to the EPA at the end of the year.

CBS 11 I-Team Looks At What’s In Your Water Tower

 

 

Chick here to see video Video

http://launch.newsinc.com/embed.html?type=VideoPlayer/Single&widgetId=1&trackingGroup=69016&siteSection=ndn&videoId=28175822

The Written article is here:

http://dfw.cbslocal.com/2014/11/19/watertowers/http://dfw.cbslocal.com/2014/11/19/water-towers/

—–Photos taken by RPWT Office Manager Debi Wheelan

Robert Perrin on com bot talking to the diver

Robert Perrin on com bot talking to the diver

Find us on FACEBOOK  or connect with Ron on Linked-In AND PLEASE SHARE THIS POST AND THE CBS NEWS STORY WITH YOUR FRIENDS EVERYONE DESERVES TO HAVE CLEAN SAFE TAP WATER, Take the Poll at www.cleanwatertankproject.com and we can make this happen!

Now we can add a brain-eating amoeba to the list of contaminants that can be in tank sediment

August 27, 2014 Leave a comment

By Ron Perrin

Removing sediment from the floor of your water tanks and towers may also be removing the habitat that allows bacteria, protozoa and viruses from getting a foothold in your distribution system. Now we can add a brain-eating amoeba to the list of contaminants that the sediment on the floor of your water storage tank can support.

Sediment being Removed from water storage tank

Sediment being Removed from water storage tank

September 16, 2013, NBC News reported: “Deadly brain amoeba infects US tap water for the first time”. The death of a 4-year-old boy near Violet, LA., was linked to the Naegleria fowleri amoeba. The child had been playing on a backyard slip-n-slide that used water from the St. Bernard Parish water system, that was later found to be contaminated with the amoeba. “Tests show it’s present throughout the water supply system in St. Bernard Parish, directly southeast of New Orleans.”

According to the CDC: “Naegleria fowleri (commonly referred to as the “brain-eating amoeba” or “brain-eating ameba”), is a free-living microscopic ameba, (single-celled living organism). It can cause a rare and devastating infection of the brain called primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). The ameba is commonly found in warm freshwater (e.g. lakes, rivers, and hot springs) and soil. Naegleria fowleri usually infects people when contaminated water enters the body through the nose. Once the ameba enters the nose, it travels to the brain where it causes PAM, which is usually fatal. Infection typically occurs when people go swimming or diving in warm freshwater places, like lakes and rivers. In very rare instances,Naegleria infections may also occur when contaminated water from other sources (such as inadequately chlorinated swimming pool water or heated and contaminated tap water) enters the nose. You cannot get infected from drinking water contaminated with Naegleria.”

The CDC also tested nearby DeSoto Parish Waterworks Dist. #1 because it was the near the site of an infection that happened in 2011 from non-potable water (lake or river, etc.). On October 8, 2013, The CDC confirmed the presence of the rare amoeba in five locations in DeSoto Parish Waterworks Dist. #1.

Heat is also a factor, an increase in only ten degrees can double the speed of bacteria growth. As record high temperatures become more common in summer months we see that keeping water distribution tanks free of sediment build up may be more important than ever before. Removing the sediment from your water tank may prevent a disaster before it can ever start.

The new Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR) will be fully implemented in 2016. It requires assessment and corrective action when there are indications of coliform contamination. The RTCR no longer includes a monthly maximum contaminant level violation for multiple total coliform detections. Instead, systems that have indicators of coliform contamination in the distribution system must assess the problem and take corrective action.  Well documented tank inspections should be part of assessing your problem.  If there is sediment build up in the tank, cleaning would be a logical corrective action to take.

The fact is, keeping your tanks clean may also prevent you from getting an RTCR violation in the first place. What we have found is this: Once the sediment is removed, our utility customers discover that chlorine costs are reduced because the chlorine is no longer losing the war with the microbes that were growing in the sediment.

However you choose to do it, just get it done. Do not let it go year after year, out of sight and out of mind.   Knowing what is in your facilities with a good inspection is your first line of defense.  If an accumulation of sediment is found, don’t think of it as “just a little dirt.” Know that it is a broken barrier that can allow contaminants to compromise the entire water supply and the health of the community

About the Author:
CSHO LOGORon Perrin is a Certified Safety and Health Official (CSHO), a member of the Texas Water Utilities Association, AWWA,

Ron Perrin Owner of Ron Perrin Water Technologies

Ron Perrin Owner of Ron Perrin Water Technologies

and the owner of Ron Perrin Water Technologies in Fort Worth, Texas. Since 1997 his company has inspected over seven thousand water storage tanks and towers in 14 states. Ron may be contacted through his web site at http://www.ronperrin.com.
Or contact RPWT Office Manager Debi Wheelan:
tankinspections@aol.com

Call: 817-377-4899

Fax 817-246-1740

The EPA is considering New Rules for tank Inspection & Cleaning

July 26, 2010 Leave a comment

On July 14th 2010 the The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency  Posted this notice under / Proposed Rules

2. Storage Tank Inspection and Cleaning

EPA requests comment on the value and cost of  periodic storage tank inspection and cleaning . There are instances of storage tanks being the source of waterborne disease outbreaks at PWSs. In December 1993, aSalmonella typhimurium outbreak in Gideon, Missouri resulted in over 600 people affected by diarrhea, 31 cases of laboratory-confirmed salmonellosis and seven deaths of nursing home residents who had exhibited diarrheal illness (four deaths were confirmed by culture). The larger of the two storage tanks had a breach in the roof hatch that allowed pigeon droppings to be carried into the tank and likely accumulated in the several inches of sediment. This contaminated sediment, more than likely, was pulled into the distribution system by a flushing program that  drained the tank (Clark et al. 1996). Salmonella typhimuriumwas isolated from the sediment of one of the towers, and tap water tested positive for fecal coliforms (CDC 1996). In March 2008, Alamosa, Colorado (with a population of about 9,000 people) experienced a waterborne disease outbreak associated withSalmonella. The report released by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (Falco and Williams 2009) indicated that the outbreak resulted in 442 reported cases of illnesses, 122 of which were laboratory confirmed, and one fatality. The State epidemiologist estimated that a total of 1,300 people may have been ill. Two storage tanks in Alamosa had several inches of sediment and breaches; one tank had breaches large enough for birds and animals to enter. Some of the key factors that contributed to these two outbreaks include significant levels of sediment (several inches to feet) and the presence of breaches of the integrity of the storage tank. Sediment accumulation occurs within storage facilities due to quiescent conditions which promote particle setting. Over time sediment continues to accumulate in a tank, even if the finished water is consistently treated tobelow 0.1 nephelometric turbidity unit(NTU). For surface water systems, it isnot uncommon to have 1⁄4 to 1⁄2 inch or more of sediment accumulate after two to three years (Kirmeyer et al. 1999).

While there are no turbidity regulations for ground water systems (except for ground water under the direct influence of surface water (GWUDI)), the levels of turbidity can be significant in the water pumped from an aquifer. Sand particles, if allowed to accumulate, provide pore spaces that house diverse populations ofbiota (which may include pathogenic microorganisms) (Kirmeyer et al. 1999; van der Kooij 2003). Periodic high flows in the storage tank may scour, stir up, and suspend the sediment (along with entrapped bacteria and pathogens) and carry it into the distribution system, with greater accumulation of sediment being a more significant concern. Other water quality problems associated with sediment accumulation include increased disinfectant demand and disinfection byproduct formation. The storage tank’s vulnerability to contamination increases when breaches of the storage tank allow insects, animals, and birds and their associated diseases to enter. Contamination from bird and other animal excrement can potentially transmit disease-causing organisms to the finished water.  Waterfowl, for example, are known carriers of many different waterborne pathogens including Vibrio cholerae(Ogg et al. 1989). Based on the potential public health implications associated with poorly maintained storage tanks (e.g., as indicated by significant sediment accumulation and breaches), EPA is interested in receiving comments and supporting information regarding the state and condition of tanks that have been cleaned and inspected, costs of storage tank inspection and cleaning, and how public health can be better protected. EPA requests information on whether there are States that recommend or require periodic inspection and cleaning of storage tanks. If so, what are the requirements, the frequency of inspection and cleaning, and how successful are they? Are inspections and cleaning done by individual PWSs or by contractors?

DATES: Comments must be received onor before September 13, 2010.

ADDRESSES: Submit your comments, identified by Docket ID No. EPA–HQ–OW–2008–0878, by one of the following methods:

• Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.govFollow the on-line instructions for submitting comments.

• Mail:

Water Docket, Environmental Protection Agency, Mailcode: 4101T, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW., Washington, DC 20460, Attention

Docket ID No. EPA–HQ–OW–2008–0878. In addition, please mail a copy of your comments on the information collection provisions to the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget (OMB), Attn: Desk Officer for EPA, 725 17th St., NW., Washington, DC 20503.

Responsible for a water system in Florida?

In Florida vent screens and hatches are required to be inspected once a year but the FLorida DEP requires that a licensed engineer inspect each Florida water storage facility at least once every five years.

Ron Perrin Water Technologies offers stat of the art underwater inspections that allow you to keep your system in service during the inspection.  This saves you time water and money.  Our dive team can also clean your water tanks with minimal water los and little if any disruption.

Visit our web site for more information at: www.ronperrin.com

The Rule:

62-555.350 Operation and Maintenance of Public Water Systems.

(1) Suppliers of water shall operate and maintain their public water systems so as to comply with applicable standards in Chapter 62-550, F.A.C., and requirements in this chapter.

(2) Suppliers of water shall keep all necessary public water system components in operation and shall maintain such components in good operating condition so the components function as intended. Preventive maintenance on electrical or mechanical equipment – including exercising of auxiliary power sources, checking the calibration of finished-drinking-water meters at treatment plants, testing of air or pressure relief valves for hydropneumatic tanks, and exercising of isolation valves – shall be performed in accordance with the equipment manufacturer’s recommendations or in accordance with a written preventive maintenance program established by the supplier of water; however, in no case shall auxiliary power sources be run under load less frequently than monthly. Accumulated sludge and biogrowths shall be cleaned routinely (i.e., at least annually) from all treatment facilities that are in contact with raw, partially treated, or finished drinking water and that are not specifically designed to collect sludge or support a biogrowth; and blistering, chipped, or cracked coatings and linings on treatment or storage facilities in contact with raw, partially treated, or finished drinking water shall be rehabilitated or repaired. Finished-drinking-water storage tanks, including conventional hydropneumatic tanks with an access manhole but excluding bladder- or diaphragm-type hydropneumatic tanks without an access manhole, shall be checked at least annually to ensure that hatches are closed and screens are in place; shall be cleaned at least once every five years to remove biogrowths, calcium or iron/manganese deposits, and sludge from inside the tanks; and shall be inspected for structural and coating integrity at least once every five years by personnel under the responsible charge of a professional engineer licensed in Florida.

DIY Potable Water Tank and Tower inspection. Updated June, 20, 2020

March 21, 2010 2 comments

GST – Ground Storage Tank Inspection

EST – Elevated Storage Tank Inspection

In Texas, potable water tanks are required to be inspected inside and out each year.  Of course, that is our business and we  are sure we have the best inspection method and offer the most information for the lowest cost.   Sometimes circumstances may arise that prevent funds from being available.

In that case, follow these steps to safely inspect your own water storage tank to meet state standards.

There are safety concerns before you get started. The first step is to be sure the person assigned to climb any type of water storage facility is fit.  Obviously climbing a water tower is physically challenging, but even smaller ground type storage tanks can require an exhausting amount of physical effort to climb.

Make sure everyone who is working on elevated surfaces (any water tank or tower) has completed a basic OSHA approved course on working at height.  Employees who conduct work on elevated surfaces are exposed to fall hazards and are required to receive fall-protection training. If you are going to make entry into the tank you will also need to acquire confined space training.  Employees who work in confined spaces face increased risk of serious physical injury. Hazards involving a confined space include entrapment, engulfment, and dangerous atmospheric conditions. As a result, employees who conduct work within confined spaces must be properly trained.

Next, you need the right equipment. Starting with a full body safety harness with Fall Protection Shock Absorbing Lanyards. If you are going to enter the tank for an inspection, a multi-gas monitor to perform atmospheric testing prior to entering a confined space is required under OSHA’s 1910.134.  You will also need at least a three man entry team that includes a supervisor, entrant and attendee.

Len Pardee

Len Pardee Environmental Compliance Officer and Inspection Supervisor (c) 2017 RPWT.

Inspection Technician on tower, using an underwater inspection camera and lighting system for a no-entry inspection.

Check the vent screen as it is the most common problem we see day after day.  The chlorine & other treatment chemicals used in potable water are very hard on steel mesh screens, so do not use stainless steel – it may seem like an upgrade, but it won’t last any time at all.

Vent Structure on EST

Vent Structure on EST

Next, check the level of the sediment on the bottom of the tank floor.  If you don’t have an underwater camera handy, you should drain the tank at least down to the level you can see the sediment on the floor. Make a note of the sediment depth & what it looks like, and make sure there are no insects, birds or other contaminants in the tank.  DO NOT ENTER the tank!  If you need to make entry into the tank you should follow all Confined Space Entry protocols including having at least a three- man trained team.  This is really important!  Chlorine gas can form above the water line in potable water storage tanks that have been treated with chlorine. In addition to that, corrosion on the steel can deplete oxygen levels in the tank making a deadly combination.  Our crews go in on their own air to dive the facility or use a remote camera to view the interior.  We NEVER ENTER THE TANK alone or unprotected!

If you choose to use an underwater camera to get a look inside, make sure it is purchased for, and only used in, potable water.  Cross contamination is a serious issue that you need to be aware of!  Visit our other blog at  www.ronperrin.us for more information on water storage tank contamination.

If you are inspecting a tank or tower with a ladder, be sure to have the fall protection equipment you need to get the job done safely.

View from the top of the ladder

Inspector on tower www.ronperrin.com

The proper safety equipment & training is the key to performing a water tower inspection safely.

Proper Safety Gear Must Be Worn

Get a copy of the Texas State Rules  for water tank inspection directly from the TCEQ here:

TCEQ 290.46 go to : Chapter 30,   TAC §290.46(m)(1)(A)

The State Form is also available HERE:

Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Tank Inspection Log

Some other states follow AWWA recommendations. Here are the main components that are required to be inspected annually in Texas, and  should be included in any potable water tank inspection.

Foundation: settling, cracks, deterioration

Condition of  Exterior Coating: rust, pitting, corrosion, leaks

Water Level Indicator: operable, cable access opening protected

Overflow Pipe: flap valve cover accessible, operable, sealed

Access Ladder: loose bolts or rungs

Roof: low spots for ponding water, holes along seams, rust

Air Vents: proper design, screened, sealed edges and seams

Cathodic Protection Anode Plates: secured and sealed

Roof Hatch: proper design, locked, hinge bolts secured, gasket

Interior inspections should include:

Condition of  Interior Coating : Check for rust, corrosion, blistering & scaling.

Water Quality Check for:

Insects in the tank both on the surface of the water and on the interior floor.

Floating debris

Sediment levels on the interior floor – (Sediment can be a habitat for bacteria & other contaminants).

Is your tank a HydroPressure Type Tank?

Pressure Type Tank

Check Operational Status: pressure release device, pressure gauge, air-water volume device

In Texas Pressure  Type Tanks that are large enough to have an inspection port are required to be inspected annually.

They are also required to be opened up and have the interiors inspected at least once every five years.

All inspection reports performed in Texas should be kept on file and available for TCEQ review for five years.


Do you need a Texas Inspection form?  Click here:  TCEQ TANK INSPECTION FORM.


Do you know how to inspect a water tower and stay safe?  Click this link to find out!

This should help you gat started on your potable water tank inspections.

If you need an inspection contractor call 817-377-4899 or see: www.ronperrin.us

Since 1997 we have performed thousands of inspections for water utilities in 14 states.

We have the proper training, inspection and safety equipment to safely deliver you the most information for the least cost.

ROV

Video Ray ROV

ROV Controller & Video Recorder

My book is a great reference point for state rules and requirements.

For safety training check out the OSHA Regional facility near you.https://www.osha.gov/otiec/

For online safety training check out https://www.oshatrain.org/

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For a price quote to inspect your water storage tank with our custom made remote water tank inspection camera and trained crew call toll free 1-888-481-1768 or use the online form at this link: Inspection Quote Request Link.
Visit my Web site at www.ronperrin.com or my other blog at www.tankdiver.us
(c) Ron Perrin 2020