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Now we can add a brain-eating amoeba to the list of contaminants that can be in tank sediment

August 27, 2014 Leave a comment

By Ron Perrin

Removing sediment from the floor of your water tanks and towers may also be removing the habitat that allows bacteria, protozoa and viruses from getting a foothold in your distribution system. Now we can add a brain-eating amoeba to the list of contaminants that the sediment on the floor of your water storage tank can support.

Sediment being Removed from water storage tank

Sediment being Removed from water storage tank

September 16, 2013, NBC News reported: “Deadly brain amoeba infects US tap water for the first time”. The death of a 4-year-old boy near Violet, LA., was linked to the Naegleria fowleri amoeba. The child had been playing on a backyard slip-n-slide that used water from the St. Bernard Parish water system, that was later found to be contaminated with the amoeba. “Tests show it’s present throughout the water supply system in St. Bernard Parish, directly southeast of New Orleans.”

According to the CDC: “Naegleria fowleri (commonly referred to as the “brain-eating amoeba” or “brain-eating ameba”), is a free-living microscopic ameba, (single-celled living organism). It can cause a rare and devastating infection of the brain called primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). The ameba is commonly found in warm freshwater (e.g. lakes, rivers, and hot springs) and soil. Naegleria fowleri usually infects people when contaminated water enters the body through the nose. Once the ameba enters the nose, it travels to the brain where it causes PAM, which is usually fatal. Infection typically occurs when people go swimming or diving in warm freshwater places, like lakes and rivers. In very rare instances,Naegleria infections may also occur when contaminated water from other sources (such as inadequately chlorinated swimming pool water or heated and contaminated tap water) enters the nose. You cannot get infected from drinking water contaminated with Naegleria.”

The CDC also tested nearby DeSoto Parish Waterworks Dist. #1 because it was the near the site of an infection that happened in 2011 from non-potable water (lake or river, etc.). On October 8, 2013, The CDC confirmed the presence of the rare amoeba in five locations in DeSoto Parish Waterworks Dist. #1.

Heat is also a factor, an increase in only ten degrees can double the speed of bacteria growth. As record high temperatures become more common in summer months we see that keeping water distribution tanks free of sediment build up may be more important than ever before. Removing the sediment from your water tank may prevent a disaster before it can ever start.

The new Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR) will be fully implemented in 2016. It requires assessment and corrective action when there are indications of coliform contamination. The RTCR no longer includes a monthly maximum contaminant level violation for multiple total coliform detections. Instead, systems that have indicators of coliform contamination in the distribution system must assess the problem and take corrective action.  Well documented tank inspections should be part of assessing your problem.  If there is sediment build up in the tank, cleaning would be a logical corrective action to take.

The fact is, keeping your tanks clean may also prevent you from getting an RTCR violation in the first place. What we have found is this: Once the sediment is removed, our utility customers discover that chlorine costs are reduced because the chlorine is no longer losing the war with the microbes that were growing in the sediment.

However you choose to do it, just get it done. Do not let it go year after year, out of sight and out of mind.   Knowing what is in your facilities with a good inspection is your first line of defense.  If an accumulation of sediment is found, don’t think of it as “just a little dirt.” Know that it is a broken barrier that can allow contaminants to compromise the entire water supply and the health of the community

About the Author:
CSHO LOGORon Perrin is a Certified Safety and Health Official (CSHO), a member of the Texas Water Utilities Association, AWWA,

Ron Perrin Owner of Ron Perrin Water Technologies

Ron Perrin Owner of Ron Perrin Water Technologies

and the owner of Ron Perrin Water Technologies in Fort Worth, Texas. Since 1997 his company has inspected over seven thousand water storage tanks and towers in 14 states. Ron may be contacted through his web site at http://www.ronperrin.com.
Or contact RPWT Office Manager Debi Wheelan:
tankinspections@aol.com

Call: 817-377-4899

Fax 817-246-1740

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Florida Tank Inspection

April 24, 2010 Leave a comment

In August 2003 the state of Florida set a high standard for the inspection & cleaning of potable water storage tanks.  Under FDEP 62-55-350 each of the states potable water storage tanks must be inspected and cleaned at least once every five years.  The FDEP allowed a grace period until August of 2008 before any enforcement action was taken.

Ron Perrin Water Technologies offers Qualified Inspections meeting all Florida requirements for potable water tank inspections.  Using underwater cameras, ROV’s or divers we are able to inspect 100% of your facility without any disruption in service.

If your tank is out of compliance for the cleaning requirement our professional potable water divers are available to remove all sediment from your water storage tanks at competitive prices.

Call 1-888-481-1768 for a quote today!

Florida Inspection Rule:

62-555.350 Operation and Maintenance of Public Water Systems. (1) Suppliers of water shall operate and maintain their public water systems so as to comply with applicable standards in Chapter 62-550, F.A.C., and requirements in this chapter.   (2) Suppliers of water shall keep all necessary public water system components in operation and shall maintain such components in good operating condition so the components function as intended. Preventive maintenance on electrical or mechanical equipment – including exercising of auxiliary power sources, checking the calibration of finished-drinking-water meters at treatment plants, testing of air or pressure relief valves for hydropneumatic tanks, and exercising of isolation valves – shall be performed in accordance with the equipment manufacturer’s recommendations or in accordance with a written preventive maintenance program established by the supplier of water; however, in no case shall auxiliary power sources be run under load less frequently than monthly. Accumulated sludge and biogrowths shall be cleaned routinely (i.e., at least annually) from all treatment facilities that are in contact with raw, partially treated, or finished drinking water and that are not specifically designed to collect sludge or support a biogrowth; and blistering, chipped, or cracked coatings and linings on treatment or storage facilities in contact with raw, partially treated, or finished drinking water shall be rehabilitated or repaired. Finished-drinking-water storage tanks, including conventional hydropneumatic tanks with an access manhole but excluding bladder- or diaphragm-type hydropneumatic tanks without an access manhole, shall be checked at least annually to ensure that hatches are closed and screens are in place; shall be cleaned at least once every five years to remove biogrowths, calcium or iron/manganese deposits, and sludge from inside the tanks; and shall be inspected for structural and coating integrity at least once every five years by personnel under the responsible charge of a professional engineer licensed in Florida. Dead-end water mains conveying finished drinking water shall be flushed quarterly or in accordance with a written flushing program established by the supplier of water; additionally, dead-end or other water mains conveying finished water shall be flushed as necessary whenever legitimate water quality complaints are received.

Water Tower Inspector

Please visit our main web site at www.ronperrin.com

and our blogs at  www.tankdiver.us and  www.ronperrin.us

And our new Florida Blog at www.floridatankinspector.com

Potable Water Tank Cleaning

March 22, 2010 Leave a comment

Check out www.potablewatertankcleaning.com for more information about cleaning potable water storage tanks.  Cleaning potable water storage tanks & towers removes the soft sediment from the floor of the tank that can be a habitat for bacteria and other contaminates.  It is very important that all equipment be  purchase purchased for and only used in potable water.  Cross contamination is a serious threat to any water supply.  In addition to having dedicated equipment all equipment entering the tank should be washed down with a chlorine solution as recommended by the AWWA.

Diver & ROV

Diver with scuba & Back up air

Photo:  The diver is in a dry suit that completely seals him in his own environment.  No part of the divers body touches the water.  He is also wearing a mask equipped with communications and dual air supply for safety.

Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies has been serving the water utility industry.  Based in Fort Worth Texas we primarily serve Texas and the Southeastern United States.

Visit our web site at www.ronperrin.com to see more information on Potable water tank Cleaning

Link to our Potable Water Tank Cleaning Web Page

For a free quote on Potable water Tank Inspection or Tank Cleaning

call 888-481-1768Visit our other blog at  www.ronperrin.us for more information on contaminates commonly found in potable water tanks.

Our TANK CLEANING web page at www.potablewatertankcleaning.com

Sediment being removed from a potable water storage tank

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